Restoring a Masterpiece

October 12 2012, 11:53 AM

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Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

The Work: Venice: The Molo from the Bacino di S. Marco, painted between 1736 and 1740, oil on canvas, 18.5 x 31 inches By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Painting Details: Look at the painting up close, and you can see discoloration and surface unevenness. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Painting Details 2: By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Painting Details 3: By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Painting Details 4: By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

In the Past: Old restorations to the painting are visible along the edges of the sky. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Starting the Process: Timothy J. Standring, Gates Foundation curator of painting and sculpture at the Denver Art Museum, considers the work and its frame with Canaletto expert Charles Beddington prior to the conservation process. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Imaging: Infrared images were taken of the entire painting to determine the level and extent of changes already made to the work and how best to approach restoration. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Up-Close: Another infrared image. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

X-Ray: X-rays were also needed to help conservator James Squires determine how best to approach the restoration process. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

The Frame: The ornate frame was also conserved (damage to the front needed to be fixed) before the painting was placed back in it. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Repairing Damage: James R. Squires, the Denver Art Museum's associate conservator of paintings, begins work on repairing damage (removing old varnish, filling in cracks) to the work. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

The Painting: Venice: The Molo from the Bacino di S. Marco By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

The Work: Venice: The Molo from the Bacino di S. Marco, painted between 1736 and 1740, oil on canvas, 18.5 x 31 inches By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Painting Details: Look at the painting up close, and you can see discoloration and surface unevenness. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Painting Details 2: By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Painting Details 3: By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Painting Details 4: By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

In the Past: Old restorations to the painting are visible along the edges of the sky. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Starting the Process: Timothy J. Standring, Gates Foundation curator of painting and sculpture at the Denver Art Museum, considers the work and its frame with Canaletto expert Charles Beddington prior to the conservation process. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Imaging: Infrared images were taken of the entire painting to determine the level and extent of changes already made to the work and how best to approach restoration. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Up-Close: Another infrared image. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

X-Ray: X-rays were also needed to help conservator James Squires determine how best to approach the restoration process. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

The Frame: The ornate frame was also conserved (damage to the front needed to be fixed) before the painting was placed back in it. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

Repairing Damage: James R. Squires, the Denver Art Museum's associate conservator of paintings, begins work on repairing damage (removing old varnish, filling in cracks) to the work. By Denver Art Museum

Canaletto: Denver Art Museum

The Painting: Venice: The Molo from the Bacino di S. Marco By Denver Art Museum

A painting by famous 18th-century Italian artist Canaletto was unearthed at the Denver Art Museum three years ago. Today, conservator James Squires has the arduous task of restoring the masterpiece to its former glory before its February debut at the museum. Take a peek at the process, then read more about its discovery here.