Shaky Path for Colorado's Marijuana Ballot Initiative

January 2005
A Colorado man writes to the New Haven Advocate explaining that Jesus may have had the munchies. The more interesting part of his letter concerns deceased Secretary of State Vickie Buckley and her alleged attempts to keep a marijuana initiative off the Colorado ballot:
In 1998 a medical marijuana (cannabis) amendment should have been placed on the ballot, but Secretary of State Vicky Buckley said citizens did not have enough signatures. A lawsuit forced a recount, which she still said was short. All this occurred late and the election ballot contained the amendment question, but Buckley refused to count it, stating it did not have enough petition signatures. Then, Vicky Buckley died unexpectedly, and after her death, boxes of petition sheets were found in her office and a recount of all the signatures initiated by proponents proved the state made a mistake. A judge then ordered the medical marijuana question be placed on the ballot again on Nov. 7, 2000. Previously, it was known as Amendment 19, but when a Colorado judge placed it on the election ballot, it was labeled Amendment 20, and citizens across the great state of Colorado were asked to vote "4 20." And they did.
And that, the writer says, is the story of how medical marijuana became law in Colorado. If you are interested in the "munchies" part, click on the link and read the whole letter.