Still More Mixed Reactions to Arizona Immigration Law

May 6 2010, 11:02 AM

"Do you favor or oppose legislation that authorizes local police to stop and verify the immigration status of anyone they suspect of being an illegal immigrant?" That was the exact question Rassmussen Reports asked Coloradans in a poll that touched on feelings about Arizona's tough new immigration law. The answers: 55 percent are in favor; 35 percent oppose; 10 percent weren't sure. If these numbers are, in general, correct, Republican candidates for governor Scott McInnis and Dan Maes are doing the right thing for their campaigns by talking loudly about how much they like what Arizona has done. As for Boulder, that's another story. The city has joined Denver Public Schools in banning all official travel to the state, according to 9News. Boulder City Manager Jane Brautigam says that a policy such as Arizona's "is contrary to Boulder's commitment to diversity and is a violation of our community's core values." Meanwhile, Congressman Jared Polis, a Boulder Democrat, has been appointed to the House Judiciary Committee (via the Daily Camera) and says he will use the post to roll up his sleeves on the issue of immigration. In a news release, the freshman congressman states, "Replacing our broken immigration system with one that works is one of my top priorities. This country should not have millions of people living and working here illegally; we must have a functional system that restores the rule of law and allows no illegal immigration." And in rural Colorado, a "lifetime" Republican is now on the record as solidly against the Arizona law, according to The Denver Post. Yuma Town Councilman Ralph Ebert recently authored a town resolution---which passed unanimously---asking lawmakers in Washington, D.C., to "find a humane solution to the illegal immigration problem." Ebert, who lives in a farming community that relies on migrant laborers, tells the Post, "If people want to live in our community and we need the labor force and we have a strong economy, we just like to see those people have a chance to find a way to become legal."

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