How Coloradans Are (So Far) Responding to Osama bin Laden's Death

May 2011

It took less than 40 minutes for a U.S. special forces team to kill Osama bin Laden in Pakistan early Sunday morning. And local media outlets wasted no time documenting Coloradans' immediate reactions after President Barack Obama officially announced the milestone last night. There will surely be more to come, but for now, here's a review of what had been published overnight:

Lone Tree's Sandy Dahl, whose husband Jason, a former United Airlines pilot, was killed in the 9/11 attacks: "I feel like I can close the door on Osama bin Laden. I feel like he does now have the justice he deserves and will be meeting his maker" (Denver Post).

Former Bush and Clinton advisor Bryan Cunningham, Denver attorney: "This is going to be such a disruptive blow to al Qaeda that perhaps for days, maybe even weeks, they're not going to know what hit them, and they're not going to have a fallback plan" (7News).

John Biber, U.S. Army veteran and Las Animas County rancher: "It could have a big effect or no effect at all. After all, bin Laden is one guy in a big network of terrorists. An important guy, but one guy. Those who will view him as a martyr could be inspired to want revenge" (Chieftain).

Loveland's Elma Palomarez, whose 26-year-old son was killed while fighting for the United States in Afghanistan in 2008: "Vindication is a very heavy word for a Christian and one I do not use. I'm happy that this has happened but I have very bad feelings for what this brings back to me and my family. My son is gone" (Coloradoan).

Bob McConnell, veteran and former Congressional candidate, living in Steamboat Springs: "It's hard to celebrate a death, but death is a part of life when you live the kind of life Osama bin Laden chose for himself. This is the kind of thing that books will be written about" (Steamboat Today).

Colorado's political leaders in Washington respond (Post):

Republican U.S. Representative Mike Coffman: "This will bring closure to the attack on 9/11, but it will have nothing to do with ending the global war on terror."

Democratic U.S. Senator Mark Udall: "As a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee and Intelligence Committee, I will continue to ensure that our government does all it can to keep Coloradans and every American safe from enemies who wish to do us harm."

Dave Cardinal, whose son-in-law was killed in the 9/11 attack on the North Tower of the World Trade Center: "Well, now we've cut the head off the snake. It may not die for a while. I worry that his death may inspire people to retaliate against Americans overseas" (Chieftain).

The view from the barstools in a LoDo watering hole (Post).