GABF: Nine Colorado Breweries To Try

October 2013

It's hard to keep up with all of the new breweries opening in Colorado—and that adds to the many reasons we're glad the Great American Beer Fest is in town. With more than 600 American—and more than 100 Colorado breweries—featured, GABF is the perfect place to explore unknown sudsy territory. This year, we plan to steer clear of Colorado's more veteran and prominent breweries, to sample some of its lesser-known assets. 

If you're thinking of doing the same, below are a few of the new, small town, and family-owned brewery selections  from the great Centennial State. Can’t make it to GABF? Use this list for your next brewery excursion.


1. Big Choice Brewing, Broomfield

Why you should check them out: The brewery’s name was inspired by the founders’ favorite album by California punk band, Face to Face.

What to try at the fest: Disconnected Red

Where to find them after the fest: 7270 W. 118th Pl., Broomfield

2. Bonfire Brewing, Eagle

Why you should check them out: It’s craft beer simplified. They use simple recipes and ingredients to brew true-to-style beers that are accessible and identifiable. 

What to try at the fest: Brush Creek Blonde

Where to find them after the fest127 W. Second St., Eagle

3. Bootstrap Brewing, Niwot

Why you should check them out: Because Niwot needed a brewery. Period.

What to try at the fest: Insane Rush IPA

Where to find them after the fest: 6778 North 79th St., Niwot

4. Pateros Creek Brewing, Fort Collins

Why you should check them out: The brewery specializes in session-style ales and lagers with an ABV lower than 5.5 percent. (Did you know: Pateros Creek flows nearby and was the original name for the Cache la Poudre River.)

What to try at the fest: Car 21, an English-style ale

Where to find them after the fest: 242 N. College Ave., Fort Collins

5. Redstone Meadery, Boulder

Why you should check them out: They’re specialists in honey wine. Mead we say more? (We couldn't help ourselves.)

What to try at the fest: Either their honey saison or their honey blonde (both are in collaboration with Aurora’s Dry Dock Brewing).

Where to find them after the fest: 4700 Pearl St., Unit 2A, Boulder

6. San Luis Brewery, Alamosa

Why you should check them out: They’re located next to the Great Sand Dunes National Park, and use locally harvested honey, spruce tips, and green chili in their brews. (They’re also expanding, and opening a craft coffee roastery next door in 2014.)

What to try at the fest: Valle Caliente, a green chili lager.

Where to find them after the fest: 631 Main St., Alamosa

7. Wild Woods Brewery, Boulder

Why you should check them out: The brewery is uses ingredients like jasmine flowers, vanilla beans, and oak to highlight mountainous elements.

What to try at the fest: Ponderosa Porter

Where to find them after the fest: 5460 Conestoga Court, Boulder

8. Wiley Roots, Greeley

Why you should check them out: An emphasis on grain-to-glass brewing means 90 percent of their beers' ingredients are Colorado-sourced.

What to try at the fest: Deep Roots Stout, a chocolate porter. 

Where to find them after the fest: 625 3rd Street, Unit D, Greeley

9. Yak & Yeti, Arvada

Why you should check them out: Yak & Yeti serves traditional Indian cuisine—and brews suds out back.

What to try at the fest: Chai Milk Stout

Where to find them after the fest: 7803 Ralston Rd., Arvada

—Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Follow digital assistant editor Jerilyn Forsythe on Twitter at @jlforsyt.