Surviving the Ballpark with Little Sluggers

June 6 2014, 11:05 AM

A Rockies baseball game seems like the perfect family activity: it's outside, with constant action and plenty of room to wander around. But with young children, a day at the ballpark can turn sour fast. If you are heading to Coors Field this summer, here are some tips from the Colorado Rockies' Jay Alves to help make it past the fifth inning with a smile.

Don't Break the Bank on Tickets: When half the game will likely be spent meandering back and forth to the concession stand and you may leave after "Take Me Out to the Ballgame," there's no need to go overboard on expensive tickets. A family of four, with two under 12 years old, can sit in the Rockpile for just 10 bucks. Another game plan: Head to Coors Field for a Purple Monday game. Tickets are cheap, the stadium is usually less crowded, and if you wear purple, you and the fam are primed to win prizes. 

Meet a Hero: Pick up tickets for a Sunday afternoon game, and get to the ballpark a little early. From 12:40-1 p.m., four different players and coaches will sign autographs along the first base wall. Don't forget to bring a clean baseball.

Raised Up: When a kid can't see beyond the big head in front of him/her, it's tough to concentrate on the game. Check out a booster seat at Guest Relations behind Section 127. Is it your little one's first game? Ask one of the Guest Relations representatives for a commemorative pin. 

I Need... : Ballpark snacks are part of the experience, but having a planned snack-break can avert the cotton candy sugar crisis. Unknown to many is that fans can bring their own food in plastic beverage containers, soft bags, containers 16”x16”X8” or smaller, and any fruit/vegetable smaller than a grapefruit. If you have an infant, glass baby jars have the green light. Bringing in dinner from home can save you some coin and ensures the family gets a solid meal before bee-lining for the Dippin' Dots.

Red Cheeks: Pay close attention to how you kids are handling the elements. Sunday afternoon games can have temperatures in the triple digits. Make sure everyone has plenty of water (tip: bring in empty bottles to refill at the water fountains) and is slathered in sunblock. If a child starts to fade, bring them under the overhead deck for some time out of the sun. 

Extra Curricular Activities: When the game just isn't enough, run out some energy at the right field playground after you meet Dinger the dinosaur at the top of the third inning. Have little sluggers who'd rather be on the field? Head to the interactive baseball area to take some swings and let them test out their pitching arms. 

—Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Follow editorial assistant Lindsey R. McKissick on Twitter at @LindseyRMcK.