Dining

Harvest Week

The source of all good things.

August 2010

Eat Denver's third annual Harvest Week (August 21 to 27) is a celebration of Colorado's bounty. Usually the glory goes to the restaurant or chef showcasing pristine local ingredients, but we're turning that idea upside down and giving credit where credit is due. Here, a sampling of the farmers, ranchers, and producers who tilled, tended, and crafted your meal before it hit the plate. For a list of participating restaurants, visit EatDenver.com.

  • Wisdom's Natural Poultry
    » 157.70 miles from Denver
    Jay and Cindy Wisdom raise their chickens and turkeys the right way: in the Colorado sunshine on a diet of hormone- and antibiotic-free corn and soybean meal.

    Taste: Jonesy's EatBar's herb-roasted chicken with twice-baked potato, sautéed greens, Pablo's Coffee and Ten FIDY stout "redeye gravy."

  • Morning Fresh Dairy Farm
    » 72.26 miles from Denver
    This Bellvue dairy has been family operated since 1894. The Graves grow the alfalfa and corn to feed their cows, never use pesticides or growth hormones, and only administer antibiotics to sick animals (who are then pulled out of production). They also produce the fabulously creamy, Australian-style Noosa Yoghurt.

    Taste: Tarbell's Southglenn's creamy dressing on the watermelon wedge salad; Duo Restaurant's cream gelato; Snooze's Palisade peach pancakes with Noosa Yoghurt.

  • Smith Farms
    » 164.29 miles from Denver
    For 22 years, Smith Farms' juicy, sun-drenched Rocky Ford melons have been some of Colorado's most anticipated—and celebrated—summer fruit.

    Taste: Encore Restaurant's cantaloupe granita with mint syrup.

  • Torpedo Farms
    » 118.97 miles from Denver
    Since 1970, the Mauro family has raised high-quality Duroc, Hampshire, Yorkshire, and crossbred swine on its Pueblo ranch.

    Taste: Table 6's porchetta with Hazel Dell mushrooms, peaches, cream corn, and Verde Farm's microgreens.

  • Cure Organic Farm
    » 28.08 miles from Denver
    Less than 10 miles outside of Boulder, Anne and Paul Cure grow 90 varieties of certified organic veggies, herbs, and flowers—all of which are distributed locally. The family also raises bees, laying hens, ducks, pigs, and sheep.

    Taste: Café Colore's arugula salad with toasted hazelnuts and Haystack Mountain goat cheese; Duo's Colorado wine-candied baby beet cake with Morning Fresh Dairy Farm cream gelato; Olivéa's lemon-olive oil cake with Red Wagon Farm tarragon ice cream and Cure's wildflower honey crunch.

  • Ela Family Farms
    » 240.45 miles from Denver
    Steve Ela's organic peaches, apples, pears, and cherries are coveted by both chefs and those shopping at farmers' markets.

    Taste: Tables' peach salad with garden mint and basil vinaigrette; Z Cuisine's MouCo ColoRouge cheese fondue with grilled Ela Family Farms apples.

  • Berry Patch Farms
    » 18.59 miles from Denver
    Perhaps best known as a pick-your-own spot for berries, flowers, and produce, this Brighton farm also grows produce prized by chefs.

    Taste: The Lobby American Grille's cherry-glazed Beeman Farms' pork loin over Borden Farms' sweet baby carrots.

  • Heirloom Gardens
    » Denver
    Two years ago, Sundari Kraft launched this NSA (Neighborhood Supported Agriculture)—a verdant collection of urban farms—in Northwest Denver.

    Taste: Duo's tomatoes with red-wine vinaigrette, house-made ricotta, torn basil, and garlic croutons.

  • The Garden
    » Denver
    Many chefs have taken the local-is-better approach to heart, growing their own herbs and greens in backyard, patio, and rooftop gardens.

    Taste: The Fort's signature salad with organic arugula, red lettuce, and buttercrunch lettuce; Parallel Seventeen's chrysanthemums, Armenian cucumbers, Thai basil, cilantro, and watercress show up in several of the restaurant's dishes.

  • Eat Denver's third annual Harvest Week (August 21 to 27) is a celebration of Colorado's bounty. Usually the glory goes to the restaurant or chef showcasing pristine local ingredients, but we're turning that idea upside down and giving credit where credit is due. Here, a sampling of the farmers, ranchers, and producers who tilled, tended, and crafted your meal before it hit the plate. For a list of participating restaurants, visit EatDenver.com.