From the Editor

Springing Forward

A letter from the editor of 5280 Home Spring 2014, Cheryl Meyers.

March 2014

Magazine production cycles have us editors working pretty far in advance, so as I sit down to write this letter, it’s a blustery Monday in January. It’s one of those days when the lawn is an especially dreary shade of brown, and I can’t yet picture the verdant foothills of a typical Colorado late spring. It’s one of those days when I’ve brought out the wool socks, down jacket, and ugly boots. It’s one of those days that, frankly, makes me want to book a trip to the tropics. 

Luckily, I’ve got the next best thing here at my desk—page proofs of the spring issue of 5280 Home—to remind me of warmer, lusher days to come. This issue, I am excited to report, is brimming with fresh ideas and colorful photos (brown, begone!) that will have even the winter-weariest Denverite brushing off his patio furniture. 

Got a green thumb? In “Dig It," we round up the latest eye-catching garden gear (mint green watering can, anyone?) that’s sure to inspire your spring planting. In “For The Birds," we learn about a new shop that’s got everything for the aspiring urban farmer—right down to custom chicken coops. And in “Zen, Mastered," we meet Dee Chirafisi and Jim Theye, whose small but abundant courtyard redefines the term “urban oasis.” It feels especially fitting to include this project as the landscape designer, Guenther Vogt—co-founder of LoDo’s beloved floral shop Bouquets—died this winter. We’re glad his vision lives on in the inventive space. 

And don’t miss the story of homeowner Sarah Kaye’s condo (“Modern Glamour”), which really has me pining for the Technicolor hues of spring. Working with the interior design firm Knape & Zibell, Kaye designed the space with an eye toward effervescence. It’s a vibrant dwelling where fuchsia-upholstered patio furniture and a lavender zebra-print ottoman feel right at home. As I flip through the photos, I can almost see the pink peonies that will soon be blooming in my garden—and I think I’ll stay put after all. 


—Photography by Jefferson Panis