Feature

The Dark Side of Fitness

Inside the often unfortunate, sometimes weird, and occasionally gruesome drawbacks of fitness fanaticism.

April 2016

—Photography by Tom Speruto

Because fitness is f&%#ing expensive.

Here’s (approximately) how much dough you can expect to spend, depending on your particular discipline. Keep in mind if you’re not competing in a local event, you’ll need to add the cost of airfare and baggage (a bike can cost up to $300 round trip), lodging, and food to your total.

—iStock

To train for and compete in a triathlon: 

Wet Suit ($200)
+ Swim Cap ($10)
+ Goggles ($40)
+ Gym membership with lap pool access ($50/month)
+ Road bike ($4,000)
+ Bike shoes ($150)
+ Helmet ($100)
+ Socks ($15)
+ Cycling clothing ($300)
+ Sunglasses ($100)
+ Tools/spare gear ($100)
+ GPS device/bike computer ($130)
+ Gels/drinks/food ($80)
+ Running Shoes ($150)
+ Running Clothing ($120)
+ Event Entry Fee ($200)
= $5,745

To train for and compete in a road marathon:

Running shoes ($150)
+ Running clothing ($120)
+ Socks ($15)
+ GPS device ($250)
+ Hydration belt ($40)
+ Gels/drinks/food ($80)
+ Event entry fee ($200)
= $855

To train for and compete in a long-distance cycling event:

Road Bike ($4,000)
+ Bike shoes ($150)
+ Helmet ($100)
+ Multiple pairs of socks ($30)
+ Multiple layers of cycling clothing ($500)
+ Sunglasses ($100)
+ Tools/spare gear ($150)
+ Gels/drinks/food ($80)
+ Gloves ($25)
+ GPS Device/bike computer ($130)
+ Event entry fee ($200)
= $5,465

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