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Natasha Gardner

Natasha Gardner writes and edits longform journalism and multimedia projects for 5280 and is a regular columnist for 5280.com. She was named a finalist for a 2012 National Magazine Award in the public interest category for “Direct Fail,” an expose of Colorado’s “direct file” policy of sending juveniles to adult prison. Since that story was published, the state has dramatically changed the direct file law. Her investigation of the Colorado foster care system (“Unwanted”) received multiple awards, including a prestigious Sigma Delta Chi Award from the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2010, she was also a National Magazine Awards finalist for “Low on O2,” a service package that explores the impact of altitude on day-to-day life in Colorado (co-written with Lindsey B. Koehler). She also won The Knight-Risser Prize for Western Environmental Journalism for “Dry Times,” an investigation of Colorado’s water crisis that she co-wrote with Patrick Doyle. Gardner has appeared on Colorado Public Television to discuss her work and current affairs. She was a Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma Ochberg Fellow in 2011. Before settling in Colorado, she worked in book publishing in New York. She has a BA from Smith College and holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Colorado. She lives in Denver with her husband and son.

Is Colorado Ready for November?

Whether it’s 1920 or 2020, any election cycle is fraught with talk about security and voting rights—but this year is unlike any ballot season we’ve seen.

How Suffragist Strategies Are Used Today

Suffragists didn’t invent political organization tactics, but they took what others had used before, adjusted them for their needs, and found success. And campaigns and advocates are still using that same adopt-build-change strategy.

Why Colorado Women Vote

In their own words, Centennial State women explain what exercising their right to vote means to them.

Voting Rights Milestones

Making sure that Americans have equal access to the polls has been a long process—and it’s still evolving.

Was Colorado the First to Let Women Vote?

Awarding a blue ribbon is complicated—but Western states, including Colorado and Wyoming, were early adopters when it came to extending suffrage to female citizens.

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