Get Involved: Greenhouse Scholars

April 3 2013, 1:47 PM

If memories of college exams, all-nighters, and tuition bills still make you break out in a cold sweat, imagine the added stress if your family lost its home to foreclosure. Graduating college can be particularly hard on low-income students, who tend to have significantly lower graduation rates than wealthier classmates. 

Boulder-based Greenhouse Scholars is working to even out the playing field by helping high-achieving (on average, Greenhouse Scholars maintain GPAs that are about 30 percent higher than those of their college peers), under-resourced students earn four-year college degrees. The program aims to reduce social restrictions (like caring for siblings or ill parents at home) and financial barriers by offering renewable scholarships and connecting students with internships and mentors that can provide career guidance. Thanks to this comprehensive approach,  participants' chances of graduating are eight times higher than those of other students in similar circumstances. Since its inception in 2005, Greenhouse Scholars has aided about 100 students—72 percent of whom are the first in their family to attend college.

On April 11, the organization will host its fifth annual Glass Half Full fund-raiser, where current scholars will share their experiences with the program. This year's event includes a wine tasting led by Infinite Monkey Theorem's Ben Parsons, fare from Table 6Root DownLinger, and Pinche Tacos, an auction, and acoustic folk-jazz sounds from Boulder’s Mezzo MestizoProceeds from the event will assist (financially and beyond) bright young people who want to attend college and succeed in the professional world. 

Get Involved: Purchase tickets here (attendees must be 21 or older) to attend Glass Half Full on Thursday, April 11, at 6 p.m. at the McNichols Civic Center Building. Can’t make it? Greenhouse Scholars hosts many other events throughout the year. You can also check out the program’s volunteer opportunities, such as mentoring or serving as a professional contact.

—Image courtesy of Greenhouse Scholars