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It takes four hours to make the components and assemble the dessert. (It'll take you less than five minutes to devour it). Photograph by Jennifer Olson

Anatomy of: Miette et Chocolat’s Flatirons Entremet

Breaking down Miette et Chocolat's contemporary take on the s'more.

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For tent-pitching Coloradans, the phrase “campfire dessert” is synonymous with the s’more, that simple sweet of just three ingredients, a stick, and fire. Owners Gonzalo “Gonzo” Jimenez and David Lewis of Miette et Chocolat (which opened its first brick-and-mortar location in the Stanley Marketplace this past December) were inspired by the classic to create this slightly more complex beauty. Named the Flatirons Entremet, after Boulder’s famous rock formations, the $46 treat serves up to eight people. Here’s a peek into how they put it together. The Stanley Marketplace, 2501 Dallas St., Aurora, 303-658-0861, mietteetchocolat.com

1. Mountain Majesty

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Jimenez crowns the creation with batons of Italian dry meringue, candied hazelnuts, edible gold leaf, and jagged pieces of Miette et Chocolat’s caramelized white, dark, and milk chocolates to mimic the jutting shapes of the Flatirons.

2. Icing On The Cake

Chocolate glaze coats the masterpiece in a smooth, shiny blanket.

3. Up In Smoke

Smoked chocolate mousse surrounds the interior layers. The smoking process lasts no more than 10 minutes to capture a gentle singed flavor that doesn’t overwhelm the cocoa.

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4. Dark Delight

A layer of classic brownie provides fudgy richness.

5. Out Of The Woods

The fluffy vanilla marshmallow layer contains cream infused with the flavor of wood chips. Jimenez and Lewis tested three types of Colorado wood before deciding on their favorite: blue spruce.

6. Easy As Pine

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For the pine-scented ganache, Jimenez and Lewis forage juniper pine needles and then steep their finds in heavy cream for 45 minutes (before straining them out). The needles impart a slight citrus flavor.

7. Smart Cookie

A hazelnut “sable” (a French shortbread cookie) forms the crisp base.

This article appeared in the April 2017 issue of .

Callie Sumlin, Associate Food Editor

Callie Sumlin creates stories for 5280's Eat & Drink section, manages the dining guide, and oversees 5280.com's digital food-related coverage and weekly e-newsletter, Table Talk.

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