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Jason Crow
Rep. Jason Crow, D-Colo., comforts Rep. Susan Wild, D-Pa., while taking cover as protesters disrupt the joint session of Congress to certify the Electoral College vote on Wednesday, January 6, 2021. Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via AP Images
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Chaos Erupts at the U.S. Capitol As Congress Meets to Certify the 2020 Election Results

In Denver, a crowd of around 700 demonstrators gathered at the Colorado State Capitol to protest the election of Joe Biden as the next president of the United States.

On Wednesday, as the U.S. House of Representatives gathered to certify the electoral college votes to name Joe Biden the next president of the United States, an enraged crowd surrounded the U.S. Capitol, breaching its doors, breaking windows, and swarming the House Chambers, forcing legislators, staff, and the press to shelter in place and evacuate. Four people died during the insurrection, including one woman was shot, and more than a dozen police officers were injured.

As the shocking scene unfolded live on television and across social media, the rioters were seen marching into the Capitol Hall, overwhelming police and security officers as they trespassed on federal property. One individual took the podium in the House Chambers and falsely proclaimed that the election was stolen from President Donald Trump. Others breached the private offices of legislators, including House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, and gleefully posed for photographs, seemingly unaware that they were committing federal crimes.

From inside the Capitol, Colorado’s congressional delegation updated followers on their status and the events that were unfolding.

Later, Crow (D, 6th Congressional District) tweeted an update that he was trapped in the House Chamber when rioters tried to ram the doors down and storm the Chamber.

In a video posted on Twitter, Colorado’s 4th Congressional District Representative Ken Buck (R) said, that while he and his staff are fine, he urged the rioters to stop the violence. “We can not tolerate anarchy,” he said.

Colorado’s 1st Congressional District Representative Diana DeGette (D) tweeted that she was safe and locked down “because the president has instigated a riot to try to block us from certifying the election for his opponent.” She later tweeted that she was evacuated to an undisclosed location. 

The assault on the Capitol came just hours after President Trump spoke to hundreds of supporters gathered on the National Mall for the Save America March. In a rambling call to action, Trump reiterated false claims that the election was stolen from him, and repeatedly encouraged Vice President Mike Pence, who presides over the certification process, and Republican legislators to somehow overthrow the results. “We will never give up. We will never concede. It will never happen,” Trump said. “You don’t concede when there’s theft involved. Our country has had enough. We will not take it anymore.”

Demonstrators from the event followed the president’s urging to march to Capitol Hill to “give our Republicans the kind of pride and boldness that they need to take back our country.”

Shortly before the mayhem began, Colorado’s newly minted Congresswoman Lauren Boebert (4th Congressional District) and 5th Congressional District Representative Doug Lamborn joined the group of Republicans in challenging the electoral college votes from Arizona. In a loud and widely inaccurate speech on the floor, Boebert falsely claimed that the state unlawfully amended its voter laws by extending the registration period.

Boebert’s speech was followed by Representative Joe Neguse, a Democrat from Boulder, who said, “In the United States, we accept the results of free and fair elections…We don’t ignore the will of the voters.”

People attend a rally in support of President Donald Trump Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, outside the State Capitol in downtown Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

As events unfolded in Washington, a crowd gathered outside the Colorado State Capitol for the “We Are the Storm” rally swelled from around 150 at noon to an estimated 700 by 2 p.m. According to Colorado Newsline reporter Chase Woodruff, who was on the scene, as speakers took the microphone, they kept those gathered apprised of what was unfolding at the nation’s Capitol.

 

 

While the demonstrations in Denver have remained peaceful, around 2:15 p.m., Mayor Hancock instructed city agencies to close municipal buildings “out of an abundance of caution.”

The police presence at the state Capitol was light at first, but Colorado Public Radio reporter Allison Sherry later tweeted that the FBI were involved.

On Wednesday afternoon, while Trump doubled down on his election delusions, President-elect Joe Biden addressed the nation, calling for the extremists to “pull back and allow democracy to go forward.”

“At this hour, our democracy is under unprecedented assault unlike anything we’ve seen in modern times,” Biden said. “Today is a reminder—a painful one—that democracy is fragile. To preserve it, requires people of goodwill, leaders with the courage to stand up, who are devoted not to the pursuit of power, or their personal interest—their own selfish interests—but to the common good.”

This is a developing story and will be updated as new information becomes available.

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